I get to meet amazing people from all walks of life. Some people love what they do, some know a lot about what they do, some are very good at it, and some are great in communicating that to other who do not have their level of knowledge in a way that is not only easy to understand and inspiring.

Alastair Morrison is such a man. I recently asked Alastair, who specializes in helping business owners and MDs run more effective businesses, to help me streamline particular areas of my business. I was so impressed by his insight and understanding that I’ve asked his permission to re-publish 4 articles he wrote to help grow business, titled,

  1. Working On (not In) Your Business
  2. Do you know who your ideal clients/customers are?
  3. The Law of the Mind
  4. Where do you most need to focus your marketing attention?

The Law of the Mind

While The Law of Leadership in Al Ries and Jack Trout’s seminal book, “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing”, is their first law, they argue in their third law – The Law of the Mind – that it is better to be first in the mind (of your potential customers) than to be first in the marketplace. One of the examples they give is that the world’s first personal computer was the MITS Altair 8800, launched in 1974, but it was Apple’s Apple II, launched two years later, that captured the market at the time. At the same time there was also the Commodore Pet, the IMSAI 8080 and the Radio Shack TRS-80. The name which sticks in the mind has a distinct advantage.It is, however, not just our name we would like people to remember, but what we can do for them. This is where being a specialist helps, e.g. being not just an accountant, one among many, but a tax specialist who saves you money (a rarer breed). Who would you remember more when you want to reduce your tax bill?

It’s obvious that we wish to remain in the minds of those prospects and contacts we meet, so that when the time is right for them, they will buy from us. But possibly a more important reason for wishing to remain in their minds, is so they will tell the people we have yet to meet what we can do for them – what my coach calls “delegating the prospecting”. This is altogether a harder challenge and raises the bar to one’s “elevator speech”.

So not only must we communicate what we can do for people – critically, we must also communicate whom we can do it for. Following on from the first article, it’s not just our service specialisation that we need to get over (e.g. in my case business coaching, as opposed to general coaching). Importantly we also need to help our contacts recognise the type of clients/customers we are looking for. Again in my case, it’s business owners and MD’s. Now clearly this is a much smaller market and some people I meet will not know of anyone in that category. The opposite extreme, however, is saying you work for anyone and everybody. But we all know too many “everybodies” to say anything when we meet them.

How do you wish to be remembered by those you meet?

For anyone struggling to choose their specialist niche or perhaps wishing to hone their elevator speech, this may be a good opportunity to take advantage of a no obligation 45 minute coaching session. If you would like some help here, please e-mail alastair@coachforsuccess.biz

If you are a business owner or MD Contact Alastair to find out how he can help you, on alastair@coachforsuccess.biz or http://www.theresultsmentor.com/.

Click below to read the other parts of this series:

  1. Working On (not In) Your Business
  2. Do you know who your ideal clients/customers are?
  3. The Law of the Mind
  4. Where do you most need to focus your marketing attention?
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